2013/2014 PGR Events now open for booking

PGR Development will be offering a number of events over the next academic year.  Places are limited, so book early to avoid disappointment.  You can book by either visitng the CLL Booking page: http://www.liv.ac.uk/cll/booking/ or by clicking on the workshop titles below.

If you have booked a workshop place and are no longer able to attend please contact pgrevents@liv.ac.uk as soon as possible to cancel you place.

Dates Time Event
3 Oct 14:00-16:00 Time Management Booking Open
10 Oct 10:00-12:00 Starting a Research Blog Booking Open
18 Oct 14:00-16:00 Keeping a Research Journal Booking Open
25 Oct 10:00-12:00 Thesis Writing: part one Booking Open
25 Oct 13:00-15:00 Argument Construction Booking Open
7 Nov 12:30-13:30 My Liverpool: PGR Professional Development Booking Open
22 Nov 13:00-15:00 Effective Presentations: part one Booking Open
5 Dec 13:00-16:00 Effective Presentations: part two Booking Open
15 Jan 9:30-12:00 Managing the Supervisor Relationship  Booking Open
15 Jan 13:30-16:30 Viva Survivor  Booking Open
28 Jan 9:30-12:00 Writing for Publication  Booking Open
28 Jan 13:30-16:30 Critical Analysis of Research Papers  Booking Open

Time Management

3 October 2013

14:00-16:00

The autonomy you experience during the pursuit of your PhD is an attractive part of research; however, if you fail to manage your time successfully, the PhD can become a stressful experience.  This session we will consider how to effectively utilise your time by exploring how to:

  • Prioritise tasks and set objectives
  • Delegate tasks and learn how to say ‘no’
  • Use your natural working cadence to enhance your productivity
  • Ensure you have a manageable work/life balance
  • stop self-sabotage behaviour that contributes to procrastination

To prepare for the workshop, please bring the current method you use to organise your schedule (diary, tablet or phone).

Presenter: Dr Aimee Blackledge, Researcher Developer, PGR Development 

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain B (Personal Effectiveness) and subdomain B2 (Self-Management) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Starting a Research Blog

10 October 2013

10:00-12:00

Increasingly, academics are expected to communicate their research to a wider public by using social media.   This session explores the benefits of starting a blog, including how it can help you clarify and refine your research, establish new networks and raise your academic profile.  We will consider the practicalities of starting a blog.  During this session we will explore:

  • How to select appropriate content
  • Copyright and intellectual property issues
  • Using social media to promote your blog

Please bring a 300-word description about yourself and why you are pursing your research and a laptop or tablet with Wi-Fi capabilities, if possible.

Presenter: Dr Aimee Blackledge, Researcher Developer, PGR Development

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain D (Engagement, Influence and impact) and subdomain D2 (Communication and dissemination) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Keeping a Research Journal

18 October 2013

14:00-16:00

Regularly recording the development of your thoughts and research findings can help you reflect and refine your ideas.   A research journal is an important tool that ensures that you retain valuable thoughts and it documents your changing thought patterns.  During this session, we will explore:

  • How to start a journal, both paper and electronic
  • What information should be in a research journal
  • How to index your thoughts to help you find information
  • Various methods of recording information
  • How to re-read your journal and what to do with your reflections

Presenter: Dr Aimee Blackledge, Researcher Developer, PGR Development

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain A (Knowledge and intellectual abilities) and subdomains A1 (Knowledge base) and A2 (Cognitive abilities) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Thesis Writing: part one

25 October 2013

10:00-12:00

Not all doctoral researchers are confident about their writing capabilities. Students may often feel unprepared and disempowered to write within the postgraduate research environment.  The main aim behind this two part course is that it will give you the tools, explain the structures and help you develop the confidence to get started and to maintain your writing. The session is for those PGRs from any disciplines that require submission of a substantial amount of text (80,000 words).

  • How to create a Research Question – what is a thesis?
  • How to cultivate a mind to write
  • How to create an original Thesis
  • How to accumulate material
  • Model Thesis Structures – envisaging your story
  • Creating writing networks

Presenter: Dr Richard Hinchcliffe, Head of PGR Development

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relate to domain A1 (7) Academic literacy and numeracy, of the Researcher Development Framework.

Argument Construction

25 October 2013

13:00-15:00

This session aims to raise your awareness in relation to argument in thesis and report writing.  We will consider:

  • What is an argument and why it is used in academic writing
  • Why structured argument will enhance your written work
  • How to critique the argument of others and improve your critical skills
  • How to construct effective arguments yourself

Previous participants for this session have said:

‘Excellent and was an eye-opener; excellent, engaging speaker’

‘It will aid my research greatly here in Liverpool’

‘Enjoyed the whole session’

Presenter: Dr Richard Hinchcliffe, Head of PGR Development

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relate to domain A (Knowledge and intellectual abilities) and subdomain A3 (Creativity) of the Researcher Development Framework.

My Liverpool: PGR Professional Development

7 November 2013

12:30-13:30

‘Our lessons come from the journey, not the destination.’

As a PGR, the time you spend at the University of Liverpool will be memorable.  But how can you make the most of your experience while you are here?  This one hour event is a focus group exclusively for PGRs to explore questions, such as, in addition to your research work, what other activities might you like to pursue and experience during your time at the University?   The ‘My Liverpool’ resource of co- and extra- curricular opportunities is being further developed, and colleagues involved would welcome your input concerning suggestions for professional development activities for PGRs that could be included in this resource.

Presenter: Dr Trish Lunt, Educational Developer, Educational Development

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain B (Personal effectiveness) and subdomain B3 (Professional and career development) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Effective Presentations: part one

22 November 2013

13:00-15:00

‘Practice makes perfect.’

Presenting your research effectively is an essential skill for those pursuing a research degree.  Rather than leave the delivery of your presentation ‘up to the fates’, why not join us for an interactive workshop where you will explore how to:

  • Further develop your presentation skills
  • Engage with your audience
  • Build an effective structure
  • Develop voice projection, breathing and pace
  • Effectively use PowerPoint, and other methods of data visualisation

During the session we will consider the success of TED Talks and what they can offer academic practice.Participants should bring a 500-word document about their research- this could be part of a chapter or part of a paper you plan to deliver at a conference.

Presenters: Dr Aimee Blackledge, Researcher Developer, PGR Development

David Hocker, Teaching Technology Developer, Educational Development

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain D (Engagement, influence and impact) and subdomain D2 (Communication and dissemination) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Effective Presentations: part two

5 December 2013

13:00-16:00

Watching yourself on film is one of the most effective ways to improve your presentation skills.  This workshop will offer you the opportunity to film and analyse your deliver methods for your own professional development.  Using the TED-style talk developed in part one, participants will present their research in five minutes.  Together we will discuss strategies for feeling comfortable while being filmed and how to use the experience to further develop as a presenter.

You must first attend Effective Presentations: part one before registering for this workshop.

Presenters:Dr Aimee Blackledge, Researcher Developer, PGR Development

David Hocker, Teaching Technology Developer, Educational Development

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain D (Engagement, influence and impact) and subdomain D2 (Communication and dissemination) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Managing your Relationship with your Supervisor

15 January 2014

9:30-12:00

This three-hour session encourages postgraduate researchers to take an active role in managing the relationship they have with their academic advisors: while the focus is on establishing expectations and good communication, common problems are considered along with practical solutions. The session is focused on the individuals present, who will have the chance to explore their own situations.

Presenter: Dr Nathan Ryder

Dr Nathan Ryder completed his PhD in Mathematics in 2008 (University of Liverpool) and has since worked freelance as a skills trainer and consultant. He has delivered training sessions to over 2,500 postgraduate researchers and research staff. Nathan’s main interests are in creativity, collaboration, productivity and helping postgraduate researchers prepare for the viva. In 2012 he created the Viva Survivors podcast which features interviews with PhD graduates talking about their research and their viva. In January 2013 he published his first e-book, Fail Your Viva, a short guide on viva preparation which is currently available exclusively through the Kindle Store.

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domains B (Personal effectiveness) and D (Engagement, influence and impact) and subdomains B1 (Personal qualities) and D1 (Working with others) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Viva Survivor

15 January

13:30-16:30

The viva is the culmination of the PhD process: a lot of work has led to this point, but a feeling of anxiety can go hand-in-hand with the sense of achievement at completing one’s thesis. For many PhD candidates the time leading up to the viva is filled with stress about the day, and uncertainty about what their examiners may ask.

Viva Survivor is a session for postgraduate researchers close to submitting their thesis who want to get some ideas on how to be well prepared for their viva. During the session we will consider the purpose of the viva and how one can prepare for it. By the end of the session participants will:

  • be able to identify sources of support for their viva preparation
  • have developed strategies to prepare themselves and their thesis for the viva
  • have explored questions that are frequently asked during the viva

Presenter: Dr Nathan Ryder

Dr Nathan Ryder completed his PhD in Mathematics in 2008 (University of Liverpool) and has since worked freelance as a skills trainer and consultant. He has delivered training sessions to over 2,500 postgraduate researchers and research staff. Nathan’s main interests are in creativity, collaboration, productivity and helping postgraduate researchers prepare for the viva. In 2012 he created the Viva Survivors podcast which features interviews with PhD graduates talking about their research and their viva. In January 2013 he published his first e-book, Fail Your Viva, a short guide on viva preparation which is currently available exclusively through the Kindle Store.

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domains A (Knowledge and intellectual abilities) and B (Personal effectiveness) and subdomains A1 (Knowledge base), A2 (Cognitive abilities), A3 (Creativity) and B1 (Personal qualities) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Writing for publication

28 January 2014

9:30-12:30

Dissemination of research output is a crucial component of your research career. The peer-review process associated with publication is a great way to get feedback on your research-in-progress. Publishing and having your work peer-reviewed during your PhD will be looked on favourably during your PhD viva.  So how can you improve your chances of successfully navigating the peer-review process and getting published?

Through a mixture of practical exercises, theory and discussion this workshop aims to prepare participants for publication. We’ll consider planning, pitching and practical writing issues always with a view toward successful navigation of peer review. We begin practically with simple writing exercises, look at formatting and appropriate use of language, correct mechanisms for citing, quoting and paraphrasing and how to avoid unintentional plagiarism. We’ll consider different routes to publication and how to know when and where to pitch an idea. We’ll also consider the larger context of the UK’s Research Excellent Framework (REF).

Please arrive with a written overview describing your research question, work in progress and expected contributions, 700 words maximum.  Also, if you have any papers ‘in-preparation’ please bring these along too, as it’ll provide an ideal opportunity to receive feedback.

Presenter: Dr Jennifer Allanson

Dr Jennifer Allanson is a successful researcher whose work has been peer-reviewed and published in journals, conferences, workshops and book chapters. She has organized conference sessions, workshops and managed the peer-review process for journal special editions. She also has extensive experience peer-reviewing the work of others.

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain D (Engagement, influence and impact) and subdomain D2 (Communication and dissemination) of the Researcher Development Framework.

Critical analysis of research papers

28 January 2014

13:30-16:30

One important skill that needs to be developed during the PhD process is critical analysis of the research literature. In order to successfully position your work in the wider research context you need to be able to identify the boundaries of your field and to add to or challenge the work of other researchers. This process can be daunting to start with as its difficult to know where to begin.

The purpose of this workshop is to help you to construct a simple toolkit for critically approaching the literature. We begin by looking at the purpose and practicalities of critical review. We’ll consider search strategies and think about how we can quickly identify papers of suitable quality. We’ll address reading with purpose and working in support of your thesis/ argument. We’ll also deconstruct the most common publication format, with a view to considering what we should be looking for. Participants will be asked to bring along work from their field in order to practice what we learn in the workshop.

Please arrive with a copy of a research paper from your subject that has not written by you.  This paper should form part of the background research to your own research.

Presenter: Dr Jennifer Allanson

Dr Jennifer Allanson is a successful researcher whose work has been peer-reviewed and published in journals, conferences, workshops and book chapters. She has organized conference sessions, workshops and managed the peer-review process for journal subject-specific special editions. She also has extensive experience peer-reviewing the work of others.

The skills and abilities addressed in this workshop relates to domain A (Knowledge and intellectual ability) and subdomain A2 (Cognitive abilities) of the Researcher Development Framework.